Kiev, Ukraine, Protestors, Wealth Excess

 http://www.news.com.au/world/shocking-opulence-revealed-as-ukraine-leader-flees-home/story-fndir2ev-1226835084785People wander around President Viktor Yanukovych's Mezhyhirya estate, which was abandoned

People wander around President Viktor Yanukovych’s Mezhyhirya estate, which was abandoned by security. Photo: Getty Images Source: Getty Images

As my practice I will not talk about the Articles because they speak for themselves

Comment about the situation in Ukraine is indicative of what is happening around the World. Many governments and Leaders are doing their best to hold the line and the Shocking opulence revealed as Ukraine Leader flees from his home leaving an absence situation where the leader has used the peoples money for himself .

Slowly and surely the next Government will fall again as knowledge increases and ordinary people want to have a better life.

I agree what is happening is a spirit of change in the whole world as knowledge is given to More and more people.

If you like the God who I serve cares about every person on the earth and God wants every person to come to God. Jesus because he gives you the ultimate Freedom which is in Jesus Christ. Not the freedom the Churches, Denomination offer because Churches, Leaders, Pastors, Vicars, and others put rules, on people that do not exist in God, Jesus, Kingdom

Even though Mankind in the main do not recognise at all there is delusion for people because every person who is born into the world are born, live life and then die.

God has said as you live life do not forget how I have told you to live.
www.youmustrepent.com  because when you die you will give an account to me.

People act as though God has not said, you will give and account to God about how you live while on the earth. More then that people also say God did not create the world and people ignore that on the earth there is a problem and for mankind to not be destroyed they need to come to Jesus Christ and have their sins forgiven. In other words God has said listen to Jesus Christ. But people do not.

Source

http://www.news.com.au/world/shocking-opulence-revealed-as-ukraine-leader-flees-home/story-fndir2ev-1226835084785

Shocking opulence revealed as Ukraine leader flees home

 People wander around President Viktor Yanukovych's Mezhyhirya estate, which was abandoned

People wander around President Viktor Yanukovych’s Mezhyhirya estate, which was abandoned by security. Photo: Getty Images Source: Getty Images

unimaginable luxury of the private residence of departed Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych was flung open for all to see.

As parliament voted to oust Yanukovych Saturday and he fled to a pro-Russian bastion in east Ukraine after months of bloody protest against his rule, thousands of Ukrainians wandered awe-struck around the breathtaking luxury of his abandoned property some 15 kilometres (10 miles) from Kiev after it was taken by demonstrators.

I am in shock,” said retired military servicewoman Natalia Rudenko, as she looked out over the manicured lawns studded with statues of rabbits and deers.

“In a country with so much poverty how can one person have so much — he has to be mentally sick.

“The world needs to see this and bring him to justice.”

Cars backed up for kilometres and a large crowd queued patiently at the imposing wrought iron front gates to get a glimpse of the former leader’s lavish lifestyle — fit for even the most ostentatious billionaire oligarch.

“Don’t worry, everyone will get to go inside — it is big enough for all of you,” an opposition activist standing atop a column shouted through a loudhailer. He warned people to stay off the lawn in case of landmines and to beware of provocateurs trying to damage the place.

“Welcome to Ukraine,” he said as people shuffled by.

People photograph through the windows of President Viktor Yanukovych's Mezhyhirya estate.

 People photograph through the windows of President Viktor Yanukovych’s Mezhyhirya estate. Photo: Getty Images. Source: Getty Images

Guarded just hours before by elite security forces, the property — the scale of which had been kept a closely guarded secret and appears to confirm suspicions of titanic corruption — was now under the control of anti-Yanukovych activists, patrolling the area and keeping people out of buildings to avoid looting.

According to official declarations, Yanukovych’s salary as president was around $100,000 a year. The luxury of the estate clearly showed wealth far beyond that.

At the entrance a sign was hung reading: “People, do not destroy this evidence of thieving arrogance.” Inside, visitors peered with disbelief through the windows of the palatial main house at the baroque, marble-covered living rooms decorated with gold icons and suits of armour.

People walk on the territory of Ukrainian President Yanukovych's countryside residence in

People walk on the territory of Ukrainian President Yanukovych’s countryside residence in Mezhyhirya, Ukraine. Picture: AP Source: AP

A few boxes strewn around on the marble floors hinted at a hurried exit. Amused or enraged, others posed for photos in font of towering faux-Greek columns and snapped pictures on their mobile phones of the collection of rare pheasants — imported from as far as Mongolia and Sumatra.

This picture taken through a window shows the interior of the main building of Ukrainian

This picture taken through a window shows the interior of the main building of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych’s residency near Kiev. Picture: AFP Source: AFP

For kilometres, they strolled along the waterfront promenade, up to the helicopter pad or over bridges and past horse paddocks to a vast garage housing a museum of Soviet military vehicles.

The complex for staff — who were nowhere to be seen — was itself the size of a British stately home.

Ukrainian members of parliament voted to oust Viktor Yanukovych and bring presidential el

Ukrainian members of parliament voted to oust Viktor Yanukovych and bring presidential elections forward to the 25th of May. Picture: Getty Images. Source: Getty Images

“Mum, where’s the golden toilet?” five-year old Ross asked as his mother led him around the edge of a floating banquet hall built to look like an Elizabethan galleon.

“I also want a pirate ship like this for myself,” he said.

“Don’t worry, we’ve already seized this one,” his mother Katya Ivanova replied.

Some of the visitors were still fresh from the violent clashes that left scores dead this week and saw central Kiev turned into a war zone.

“It makes it feel even more worth it,” said Bogdan Panchyshin, a hardware store owner from the Western city of Lvov.

“If only the hundred people who died could see it, I think they’d say the same,” he said, still wearing a camouflage bullet proof vest.

As they emerged, people struggled to take in the breathtaking scale of Yanukovych’s wealth.

A visitor looks at a sculpture on the territory of Ukrainian President Yanukovych's count

A visitor looks at a sculpture on the territory of Ukrainian President Yanukovych’s countryside residence. Picture: AP Source: AP

That house, that garden, that luxury,” mechanic Viktor Kovalchuk, 59, as his wife shook her head in amazement.

“It should be turned into a hospital or an orphanage or something for the people killed or injured in the protests,” Kovalchuk said.

“Whatever happens it needs to be given to the people. It was built with our money after all so it should serve us in the end.”

http://www.news.com.au/world/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-protests-in-kiev-ukraine/story-fndir2ev-1226808390931What you need to know about the protests in Kiev, Ukraine

  • by: BY JENNI RYALL WITH WIRES
  • From: news.com.au
  • 5 hours ago February 23, 2014 5:12AM

Protestors build DIY medieval catapult 0:39

 
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Protestors wearing gas masks have constructed an improvised catapult to fight riot police in the capital of Ukraine, Kiev.

  • news.com.au
  • 22 Jan 2014
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Protestors build DIY medieval catapult

Protestors wearing gas masks have constructed an improvised catapult to fight riot police in the capital of Ukraine, Kiev.

news.com.au

22 Jan 2014

A protester carries a Ukrainian flag during unrest in central Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014.

A protester carries a Ukrainian flag during unrest in central Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Source: AP

THE Ukraine capital, Kiev, has been burning for three months. Dozens of protesters have been shot dead. After escalating hell on the street, there is finally a sign of change.

What is going on?

Protesters throw molotov cocktails at police during clashes in the centre of Kiev on January 22, 2014.

Protesters throw molotov cocktails at police during clashes in the centre of Kiev on January 22, 2014. Source: AFP

 

The protest movement in Ukraine has been simmering for months, reaching escalation point over the past days.

Overnight, the regime of Viktor Yanukovych seems to have come to an end.

After he fled Kiev and vowed he would never resign, parliament voted to strip Yanukovych of power for failing in his presidential duties and called early elections.

Meanwhile, former PM Yulia Tymoshenko, Yanukovych’s main political rival, was released from prison, telling supporters “the dictatorship has fallen” and confirming she will run for president in the May 25 vote.

The fast-moving events overnight came after Yanukovych yesterday signed an agreement which signalled the first sign of change in months.

The Russian-backed president agreed to a series of concessions including going back to an original constitution, which will effectively strip him of some power, form a national unity government and hold fresh elections.

The deal was brokered by senior EU figures and was followed by the Ukrainian parliament voting to dismiss the country’s Interior Minister for using violence on his own citizens.

In January, the violence began to escalate, with the first reported protester deaths. Street battles erupted with protesters hurling fire bombs and stones as police fired back with tear gas, stun grenades and rubber bullets. Dark smoke from burning tyres, used as barricades, billowed in the air. Five people were killed.

Ukrainian protester among burning car tyres.

Ukrainian protester among burning car tyres. Source: Getty Images

 

Over the past three days, tensions again intensified.

Kiev turned into a war zone, with up to 77 shot dead when police took to the crowd with live ammunition. 

President Yanukovych has fled Kiev, as protesters took over the capital.

READ MORE: Ukraine’s draconian new laws

Ukrainian protester throws a molotov cocktail in front of burning car tyres during a mass protest.

Ukrainian protester throws a molotov cocktail in front of burning car tyres during a mass protest. Source: Getty Images

 

Why is it happening?

Protesters had been fighting against President Viktor Yanukovych’s ongoing refusal to sign a political and economic association pact with the EU after pressure from Russia.

The Ukrainian government had been working for years on a landmark trade deal with the European Union. In a sudden change of heart, Yanukovych backed out last November.

Eventually it was admitted, Russian pressure led to the turn around.

Protesters clash with police in central Kiev, Ukraine, early Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014.

Protesters clash with police in central Kiev, Ukraine, early Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Source: AP

 

The deal would have seen Ukraine citizens allowed to travel through the EU without visas; in return Ukraine would adopt hundreds of laws and regulations, and a program of sweeping reforms.

To activists, the choice between Russia or Europe is a symbol of the plans for the future of Ukraine.

Protester throws a molotov cocktail on Grushevsky street on January 22, 2014 in Kiev, Ukraine.

Protester throws a molotov cocktail on Grushevsky street on January 22, 2014 in Kiev, Ukraine. Source: Getty Images

 

Why didn’t the president want to sign?

The pressure from Russia on Ukraine can be extreme – and creates economic pressure on an already struggling economy. There have been previous cases where the Kremlin have cut off gas exports into the country and banned Ukrainian products in Russia.

 Several people have died in clashes between protesters and police in the Ukrainian capital.

Several people have died in clashes between protesters and police in the Ukrainian capital. Source: AP

 

What does Russia want?

Russian President Vladimir Putin would like to see the former Soviet states realigned. He wants to form an alliance to give the EU a run for its money and without Ukraine this dream is impossible.

He also believes the protests in Ukraine are led by western forces, referring to them as “pre-planned” and not like a revolution. He is splashing cash to put the pressure on, with deals to cut the price of gas in Ukraine and buying billions of dollars of government bonds.

Ukrainian protesters among burning car tyres.

Ukrainian protesters among burning car tyres. Source: Getty Images

 

What are the two sides?

The country has a 50/50 split between the Russian supporters and the European supporters. The industrial workers in the eastern half favour closer ties with Russia; they speak the language and have the same religion. In the western half, they have closer ties with Europe. Many are Roman Catholic and they speak Ukrainian. These are the ones who want to leave Russia in the past and create stronger ties with their European friends, they are led by the three main opposition leaders – Klitschko, Arseniy Yatsenyuk and Oleg Tyagnybok.

Ukrainian protesters shoot with a help of petards.

Ukrainian protesters shoot with a help of petards. Source: Getty Images

 

Why did the protests intensify in January?

President Yanukovych pushed through anti-legislation laws which ban most forms of protest in the country. Demonstrators could no longer wear masks or helmets and anyone who blockaded public buildings could be given a five-year jail term. Over 200,000 supporters of the opposition took to the centre of Kiev to protest against the new restrictions. 

Protesters throw molotov cocktails at police during clashes in the centre of Kiev on January 22, 2014.

Protesters throw molotov cocktails at police during clashes in the centre of Kiev on January 22, 2014. Source: AFP

 

What next?

Protesters remain in central Kiev, highly sceptical of the early election plan announced by the president and may ultimately only accept his resignation.

After months of civil war, protesters see the agreement as only words and have little trust in action taking place.

A trio of the main opposition leaders have agreed to the terms of the signed agreement and won backing from the protest organisers. Yet, whether the men and women who have remained on the streets through three-months of winter will accept the deal as easily is yet to be seen.

The agreement, which called for reversion to the 2004 constitution, would curb the president’s powers and enhance those of the parliament. It called for a new government of “national unity” to be formed in the next 10 days and the role of police to be limited to protecting public buildings.

President Yanukovych said: “I declare steps that must be done to restore peace and avoid more victims of the confrontation. I declare that I initiate early presidential elections.

“I initiate the return of the constitution of the year 2004 with redistribution of powers [to a] parliamentary republic. I call to begin the procedure of establishing the government of national trust.”

If this doesn’t eventuate, they claim there will be more bloodshed. At this point, the next days are crucial and in a country so volatile, anything could eventuate.

Ukraine horror

 

After speaking with President Yanukovych, the Opposition Leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk said: “Tomorrow we will go forward together, and if it’s a bullet in the forehead, then it’s a bullet in the forehead, but in an honest, fair and brave way.”

A pro-European Union activist stands near a barricade on Independence Square during clashes with police in central Kiev, Ukra...

A pro-European Union activist stands near a barricade on Independence Square during clashes with police in central Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Source: AP

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